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Seasonal Beer Styles with Conner Trebour – BeerSmith Podcast #180

Seasonal Beer Styles with Conner Trebour – BeerSmith Podcast #180

This week Conner Trebour joins me to discuss making pumpkin beer for the Fall as well as holiday ale for the upcoming winter holidays.

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Topics in This Week’s Episode (32:11)

  • Today my guest is Conner Trebour. Conner is CEO of Sensorshare LLC and maker of the BrewPerfect digital hydrometer. He is also an avid home brewer.
  • We start with a discussion of pumpkin beers beginning with what makes a great pumpkin beer.
  • Conner shares what kinds of pumpkins work best in pumpkin beer as the typical “Jack-O-Lantern” variety is not ideal for beer.
  • We discuss preparing fresh pumpkin as well as how to use canned pumpkin.
  • He explains some of the difficulties in brewing with pumpkin including its sticky/messy nature as well as how to contain the pulp.
  • Conner shares his thoughts on a base beer recipe to use for pumpkin ale as well as use of hops and malts.
  • We discuss spices that belong in a pumpkin beer and reflect the flavors of the season.
  • We next move on to holiday or Christmas ales which a strong ales that reflect the flavors of the holiday season.
  • He shares some of his favorite flavors to use as well as what to look for in a base recipe.
  • We discuss the use of seasonal fruits like cranberry.
  • Conner shares his thoughts on spices for a holiday ale.
  • We spend a few minutes at the end discussing his BrewPerfect business and some upcoming changes.

Sponsors

Thanks to Conner Trebour for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
order isotretinoin iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Oregon Beer News, week of 10/29 – 11/04/2018

Happy Halloween!I have an abbreviated week for being online, so I won’t be able to reliably have daily news posts up, so here is the summary of news and events for this final Halloween week of October all in one. I will work on keeping this post updated with the latest news, so check back in from time to time.

I won’t be detailing individual Halloween parties or events, unless they are specifically beer-related; I’m confident folks can find a Halloween party near them with a quick search. 🎃

Monday, Oct. 29

The Bier Stein (Eugene) is hosting a fundraiser Monday evening—Sluggo’s Real Men Wear Pink Fundraiser. “Join Sluggo & the Eugene Emeralds at the Bier Stein on Monday, October 29th from 6:00pm – 9:00pm for an evening of fun, prizes, and delicious food & drinks while raising awareness and funds for Sluggo’s Real Men Wear Pink campaign that supports Breast Cancer Awareness and the American Cancer Society. We will have a raffle to win a variety of prizes, including your very own, personalized 2018 Championship Ring! We also have Real Men Wear Pink calendars and an Emeralds Breast Cancer Awareness Tee available for purchase. Ninkasi’s Dawn of the Red and Prismatic will be featured on tap. We will donate $1 per pint of each beer sold throughout the day to the American Cancer Society and Ninkasi has agreed to match our donation!”

Portland’s Imperial Bottle Shop continues its pairing of Halloween candy with Block 15 beer this week, through Halloween on Wednesday—sort of adult trick-or-treating? “From Oct 26 through Halloween, we’ll be offering 8 beers from Block 15 Brewing Co. paired with 8 Halloween candy favorites. 4 pairings will be offered at our Division taproom, and 4 at Alberta. All beers will be available as a 4 oz sample or 12 oz glass with candy (most available as a pint as well).”

Worthy Brewing (Bend) has a new beer on tap Monday afternoon: “A new Heart and Soul Series beer is on tap at Worthy! The Wild & Hazy IPA! Six hop varieties yield a tropical taste with a smooth finish- Hops include: Amarillo, Cascade, Chinook, Ekuanot, El Dorado, Strata. 5.1% ABV, 28 IBU”

Vanguard Brewing (Wilsonville) has a new beer on tap as well: “Blackberry LPR – Imperial Oatmeal Stout; (Roasty – Fruity – Sweet); ABV 9.1%. A slight twist on a classic that is sure to delight stout and fruit beer fans alike. Blackberry LPR is a full bodied, creamy, roasty and sweet stout with tons of flavor complexity from roast grains, blackberry and honey.”

Bent Shovel Brewing (Oregon City) has a new seasonal out, International Waters: “Enjoy our newest seasonal beer “International Waters” which boasts prominent flavors of Rum, vanilla, toasted malt and slight spice. This golden brown strong ale will take you to your happy place! Barrel aged in rum soaked charred oak barrels this beer drinks smooth with a dry finish. 8.6% 20 IBU on tap at the brewery and beyond this week!”

Tuesday, Oct. 30

Deschutes Brewery (Bend): Tuesday is Community Pints day at the various Deschutes locations, where $1 from every pint sold goes to benefit a non-profit—for October, the beneficiary is Planned Parenthood and this is the final Tuesday of the month to help out PP.

Oregon City Brewing hosts its Charity Pint Night fundraiser starting at 5pm on Tuesday, and this week benefits John McLoughlin Elementary School. “Let’s cheers our beers to help support our littlest Pioneers! Join us for a pint to help raise much needed school funds for John McLoughlin Elementary School. See you there!” $1 from every pint will benefit the school.

Bridge 99 Brewery (Bend): Tuesday the brewery is releasing its Bog Trotter, brewed from an old Irish ale recipe: “The Bog Trotter Irish Ale is back! This Irish Family inspired Ale is finished with buckwheat honey. It has balanced sweetness and earthy hop undertones. 7.4% ABV 29 IBU, rich and warm to sip by the fire!”

Oakshire Brewing (Eugene): The brewery’s winter seasonal, Ill Tempered Gnome, is back and going on tap on Tuesday: “Ill Tempered Gnome has arrived- a winter-warming brown ale known to make even the most sullen gnomes smile! We’re officially releasing him tonight at our Public House 6pm.”

Sky High Brewing (Corvallis) has new beer on tap on Tuesday: “Whole Nutta Love Now on Tap! A traditional American brown gone nuts! Filberts (hazelnuts), the Oregon state nut, blend beautifully with roasted barley, chocolate malt, and light cascade hops. 75lbs of Oregon filberts roasted in house and introduced both in the hot and cold brew phases. This brew will inspire the nut lover in all of us and add a little nuttiness to all of our everyday lives! ABV: 7.5 IBU 7”

Wednesday, Oct. 31 – Halloween!

McMenamins Kennedy School (Portland) has its limited-edition beer tasting from 5 to 7pm, featuring Whiskey Widow, the Halloween seasonal with a punch: “The Black Widow has emerged from her hiding place and is spinning a whole new web! Whiskey Widow is a darkly sublime Porter that has been aged for nine months on a bed of whiskey soaked American Oak chips. The result is a dark elixir, rich with oaky smoothness, a bold whiskey aroma, and hints of vanilla. This is truly a dark beauty that packs a vicious bite!”

Deschutes Brewery has a new beer on tap at the Bend Public House: “JUST TAPPED: Body Surfin’ Brown. IBU: 43 ABV5.3% Brewers notes: An American style brown ale featuring Sterling hops. Toasted bread malt character with a balancing bitterness on the finish.”

Orenco Taphouse (Hillsboro) is hosting “Monsters vs Dragons with Fremont & Modern Times” on Halloween night starting at 7pm: “This Halloween come to Orenco and party with Fremont Brewing and Modern Times! Both make some of the best BA Stouts in the industry and we’re pitting them against each other for you to enjoy.” There will be quite a lineup of Fremont’s and Modern Times’ bourbon barrel aged stouts to drink.

Hopworks Urban Brewery (Portland) has new beer on tap, a triple IPA: “Three Sides to Every Story is our newest beer in the Imperial Hop Experiments series. This Triple IPA is brewed with three malts and three hops and at 10.5% ABV it may even have you seeing triple. This limited release beer is now available at all 3 pubs.”

Portland’s Thirsty Monk (formerly Bazi Bierbrasserie) is raising money for Trailkeepers of Oregon this week with a new IPA on: “This week we are Tapping All Our Hops! Today is Trail Monk IPA, a maple IPA and the first of the Karma Series, where a portion of each full pour goes to Trailkeepers of Oregon to protect and enhance OR hiking.”

Rogue Ales Eastside Pub in Portland (formerly the Green Dragon) has a new Green Dragon brew on tap on Wednesday: “Come join us for some adult treats. See what tricks the Green Dragon Brewers can do with the Great Pumpkin. Black Dragon Imperial Pumpkin Stout tapped at 5:00”

Thursday, Nov. 1 – El Dia de los Muertos

Three Creeks Brewing (Sisters): The brewery is hosting its annual Fall Brewers Dinner starting at 6pm, featuring four courses paired with select beers for $55. “Join us for our semi-annual 2018 Fall Brewer’s Dinner! We will be pairing some of our favorite beers with gourmet meals, created by our talented kitchen staff. November 1st at 6pm, book your seats today! 541-549-1963”

Imperial Bottle Shop is hosting a Deschutes Dissident and Moonstruck Chocolate pairing Thursday at the Division location: “As part of their 30th anniversary celebration, Deschutes Brewery is releasing three variants of it’s classic Dissident. In addition to the standard sour brown ale aged in oak with cherries, they are also releasing a version fermented 100% with brettanomyces (wild yeast) and a version that uses marionberries in place of cherries. We’ll be pouring a horizontal tasting of all three 2018 Dissidents, along with 2017 Dissident, and a pairing with Moonstruck Chocolate Co. chocolates! We will only be offering 40 chocolate pairings, which will be first come, first serve. All beers will be available separately without chocolate in a sampler tray or as individual pours.”

The Horse Brass Pub in Portland kicks off its three-day celebration of its 42nd anniversary on Thursday! “It’s our 42nd Anniversary Thursday November 1st. We are going to take that first day and just chill with it, but come the weekend we are going to tantalize your taste buds.” The Horse Brass might be, in my opinion, historically and otherwise, the most important beer bar in Oregon. If you can visit during the anniversary, you should.

Newport’s Wolf Tree Brewery will be taking over the taps at The Civic Taproom in Portland: “Join us for an evening with Wolf Tree Brewing! Come sample some beers from one of Oregon’s great, coastal breweries.” Wolf Tree brews some funky and interesting beers, worth checking out.

Friday, Nov. 2

Belmont Station (Portland) is hosting Founders Brewing for the release of CBS (Canadian Breakfast Stout) with a release party from 5 to 8pm: “We are hosting Founders for the release of CBS (Canadian Breakfast Stout), both on draft and in bottles. For those whom may not yet be familiar with this beer. CBS is a maple syrup Bourbon barrel aged coffee chocolate imperial stout, which Founders describes as a beer with rich maple syrup, roasted coffee and velvety chocolate meld together in what can only be described as a transcendental drinking experience.”

The Bier Stein is hosting the new Cyderish cidermaker from Eugene with a bottle release party Friday from 5 to 8pm: “Come celebrate with us Nov 2nd from 5-8pm! We’ll be popping bottles of brand new Cyderish Imperial Dry Cyser that you have been enjoying in keg as ‘Hardcore & Dry’.”

McMenamins is celebrating the release of Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome across many locations on Friday. This is a class Winter Warmer, one which many American craft winter ales were modeled on (particularly in the early days) so it’s neat to see McMenamins bringing this to the taps. “Winter Welcome was first exported from England to the U.S. in 1990, and we’ve been welcoming it ever since. This ale is honey-amber colored with a creamy head of small bubbles, floral aroma and delicious caramel maltiness. It finishes with a fine hop aroma and a fruity note from fermentation in a “Yorkshire Square,” a two-level fermenting vessel. Throughout history, beer of somewhat higher alcohol and richness, like this one, has been enjoyed for the winter holidays when old friends get together to enjoy the season. Come share one with us as we welcome winter!”

Saturday, Nov. 3

McMenamins Old Church & Pub (Wilsonville): Saturday is the 6th annual Boone’s Ferry Autumn Ale Fest, taking place all day long: “We’re back for the sixth year with more than 20 different beers and ciders that are perfect for the season. Help choose the best beer or cider of the bunch, whose maker will be awarded the famed Boone’s Ferryman oar trophy. We’ll have beer and cider from McMenamins and local guests, and live music!” The list of participating breweries is here, and a tasting package (glass plus 12 tokens) costs $22.

Saturday is the annual American Homebrewers Association’s Learn To Homebrew Day, where “thousands of people will gather at Learn to Homebrew Day sites worldwide to brew beer and and learn about the hobby of homebrewing.” This is the 20th annual event, which started in 1999, and you can find an Oregon event on the AHA site—or register an event if your homebrew club is hosting an event. As of Tuesday morning, here’s the list of Oregon events:

McMenamins 23rd Avenue Bottle Shop (Portland) is hosting a 2 Towns Ciderhouse tasting from 2 to 4pm.

Breakside Brewery (Portland): The Slabtown location is hosting a book signing of Craft Beer Country with Kirk Richardson on Saturday from 5 to 8pm: “Share a pint with author Kirk Richardson and celebrate Craft Beer Country’s chapter on Breakside Brewery!”

Sunday, Nov. 4

Ecliptic Brewing (Portland) is hosting IPAs for Eyes, in partnership with OHSU Casey Eye Institute, to help raise funds for glasses: “On Sunday, November 4th, Ecliptic Brewery will be partnering with the OHSU Casey Eye Institute (Casey) Community Outreach Program to host IPAs for Eyes, a sudsy benefit to help fund quality prescription glasses statewide for underserved Oregon residents through the Casey Community Outreach Program. In addition to Ecliptic donating 10% of ALL pub sales from the day to help fund these glasses, the event will include a special IPA taster tray and a raffle for some exclusive prizes donated by Ecliptic, Breakside, Zoiglhaus, the Trailblazers, Oregon Zoo, Winterhawks and many others at 4:30 PM. Raffle tickets can be purchased at the brewery from October 28th to November 4th.”

The post Oregon Beer News, week of 10/29 – 11/04/2018 appeared first on The Brew Site.

Oregon Beer News, 10/25/2018

Oregon Beer, Widmer Brothers BrewingHere is the Oregon beer news for this Thursday, October 25, rounding up the happenings and news from around the state. As usual, I’ll be periodically updating this post throughout the day, so check back in from time to time. And of course feel free to contact me anytime with any news or information.

Widmer Brothers Brewing (Portland) collaborated with Lyft to create Closing Time IPA, and today Loyal Legion is hosting the kick off party starting at 6pm: “We teamed up with Lyft on a limited release beer, “Closing Time IPA,” a session IPA that includes a unique code for up to 50% off your next Lyft ride home on every can. We are kicking off the release with our friends at Loyal Legion – you can enjoy special pricing on Closing Time IPA and other Widmer Brothers brews and come hang out with the Lyft Portland and Widmer Brothers Team – we will be making a per can donation to MADD Oregon Chapter – come out and help support!”

On the heels of yesterday’s news about Alameda Brewhouse closing (with the brewery itself possibly to follow), news on two more brewery closures dropped as well: Seven Brides Brewing in Silverton is closing its taproom and restaurant, and Two Kilts Brewing of Sherwood has apparently closed entirely. The New School has a few additional details:

Two Kilts Brewing was once a successful, multi-award winning Sherwood brewery with a big expansion and relocation to Hillsboro in the works, but those dreams were dashed in 2015. Since then, we haven’t seen a lot of the company’s beers. The brewery won a Silver medal at GABF in 2016 and a Gold at World Beer Cup in 2014 for its Scottish Ale. Two Kilts has not shared anything about the closure; in fact, the brewery hasn’t even shared anything since July. The business phone line is disconnected and both Yelp and Google list it as permanently closed.

Ochoco Brewing (Prineville) has a pumpkin ale on tap tomorrow: “Chocolate Porter+Smoked Pumpkins=???? We’re tapping our Smoked Pumpkin Porter tomorrow at 5pm! We’ll also be offering some Samples of our 2017 CW Schnocker!” I’m not sure I’ve had a smoked pumpkin beer.

Crooked Jay Brewing (Bend) has a fresh hop beer out: “Get it while it’s fresh! Crooked Jays first endeavor into fresh hopped beer is now available and pouring at On Tap on Bends east side. Crooked Jay Fresh Hop Original IPA. This is a collaboration with Cloverdale hops. And it’s amazing!”

The post Oregon Beer News, 10/25/2018 appeared first on The Brew Site.

Fifteen Year Anniversary Sale on BeerSmith 3 – Get Up to 33% off!

Fifteen Year Anniversary Sale on BeerSmith 3 – Get Up to 33% off!

In October of 2003, I launched the very first version of BeerSmith. This month we’ve reached our 15 year anniversary! To celebrate, we’re having a sale on all BeerSmith 3 desktop packages. If you have not yet upgraded to BeerSmith 3, this is your chance to get BeerSmith 3 desktop at our very lowest price Gold licenses start as low as $9.95/year, and the non-subscription basic option is also on sale. The sale ends 31 October 2018.

Get BeerSmith 3 on Sale!

BeerSmith 3 Sale – Our Best Price Ever!

We launched BeerSmith 3 desktop back in June and added a ton of new features including integrated water tools, better whirlpool hop support and support for mead, wine and cider plus cloud folders and much more. Since it was launched in the summer season, many brewers missed the chance to upgrade during our discounted upgrade period.

So today, we celebrate our 15th anniversary by offering the same “introductory” discount on BeerSmith with 20-33% off all packages. This includes the “basic” non-subscription option which is similar to the BeerSmith 2 license terms as well as our Gold and above packages which offer additional cloud space.

If you have not upgraded to BeerSmith 3 yet, you can download the trial version today and give it a try, but be sure to purchase your upgrade by halloween, as we’ll be ending the sale at midnight (11:59 pm Eastern time) on 31 October 2018.

Thanks again for all of your support these last 15 years!

Brad Smith

Fifteen Years of BeerSmith – Our 15th Anniversary

Fifteen Years of BeerSmith – Our 15th Anniversary

In late October of 2013, I published version 1.0 of BeerSmith. Now 15 years later, the BeerSmith community has grown and through the software, newsletter, articles and podcast to reach hundreds of thousands of brewers worldwide. I would like to personally thank each and every one of you for your continued support.

A Brief History of BeerSmith

BeerSmith was originally designed as a personal beer brewing tool for my own use. In early 2003, a few people from various forums and news groups helped me refine it from a relatively primitive collection of tools into the first release. The first version was released in late October of 2003. The program included the basic recipe builder and a number of brewing tools and was only available for Windows.

BeerSmith 1 was followed by 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4 in the following years, but still remained a bit of a niche tool until about 2008. In 2008, I took major steps to revamp the web site, and also started the weekly BeerSmith Blog, which now has over 500 articles on brewing. I also started working on social media and a bit more marketing which resulted in a slow increase in traffic and sales over the next few years.

The Cake is a Lie

The next major milestone was 2010, when I made the choice to leave my day job and take on BeerSmith full time. I started the BeerSmith newsletter as a way to share articles that Spring. That Fall, I started the BeerSmith podcast and also started working full time on BeerSmith 2. A collection of my articles was published in book form in November as Home Brewing with BeerSmith. BeerSmith 2 was launched in June of 2011, right before that year’s Homebrew convention. BeerSmith 2 added the tabbed browsing interface many are familiar with, letting you work with several tools and recipes at once. It also included support for the Mac and eventually Linux as well.

In 2012, I added the BeerSmith cloud at BeerSmithRecipes.com which has since grown to over 800,000 recipes. In 2013, BeerSmith mobile was added for Android, iPhone, iPad and the Kindle Fire. In 2014, John Palmer and I shot and published two full length videos on brewing: How to Brew Extract and All Grain, which were also well received. In the years to follow versions 2.2 and 2.3 were published.

Finally on June 15th of this year, I published BeerSmith 3 which added mead, wine and cider support to the BeerSmith recipe program, along with a number of advanced beer brewing functions like mash pH estimation and better whirlpool hop support. The updated mobile version followed a little over a month later bringing many of the same features to phone and tablet users.

A Few Statsistics (as of October 2018)

BeerSmith is used worldwide, and the software and articles have been translated into many different languages:

Thank You All

I would like to personally thank each and every one of you for your continued support of BeerSmith, along with my family who make it all possible. I feel incredibly blessed to be able to pursue home brewing full time, as well as having the opportunity to meet and exchange messages with thousands of brewers who share a passion for beer. Best wishes to you and thank you again for everything!

US Homebrewing Industry 2018 with Jake Keeler- BeerSmith Podcast #179

US Homebrewing Industry 2018 with Jake Keeler- BeerSmith Podcast #179

This week Jake Keeler joins me to discuss the state of the US homebrewing industry and this year’s industry survey as well as how to make homebrewing fun again!

Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Topics in This Week’s Episode (42:49)

  • Today my guest is Jake Keeler. Jake is a former AHA governing committee member, and he is chair of the current Industry panel. He also works at BSG, a major wholesale provider of beer brewing equipment and ingredients.
  • We discuss the 2018 Homebrew Industry survey which is published annually – it is a survey of mainly retail home brewing outlets in the US.
  • Jake provides a few highlights from the survey
  • We discuss some of the long term trends in US homebrewing including the slow decline in sales which started a few years back.
  • Another trend we cover is the substantial move from extract to majority all grain brewers which continues.
  • Jake explains the sale of beginner kits and which have been declining a bit, but also how many brewers are coming directly into all-grain.
  • We talk about the “Amazon effect” and the continued growth of large online retailers at the expense of some small suppliers.
  • We cover a few other topics such as wine making kits from the survey and Jake provides his summary.
  • Jake shares his thoughts on another topic – which is simply “making homebrewing fun again”.
  • He gives his closing thoughts.

Sponsors

Thanks to Jake Keeler for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Yeasty Flavors in Beer – Off Flavors in Home Brewing

Yeasty Flavors in Beer – Off Flavors in Home Brewing

This week I take a look at yeasty off flavors in beer as well as their cause and how to prevent them. Yeasty flavors are common in many home brewed beers, especially those who are young.

Yeasty Off Flavors in Beer

Yeasty off flavors can appear bready, yeasty, doughy, or be the flavor of a Vegemite sandwich. Most brewers are familiar with this “green beer” flavor having tasted their beer when it is still young. Those who have sampled Hefeweizen which is served with the yeast also have some idea of the flavor of yeasty beer.

Not surprisingly the main cause of yeasty beer is simply that the beer is too young. Beer goes through changes as it matures including the mopping up of off flavors like diacetyl and also a critical process called flocculation where the yeast slowly falls out of the beer.

Flocculation occurs at different rates depending on the beer and also the yeast strain used. You can, in fact, look up the flocculation rate for the yeast strain you are using by referring to the yeast data sheet. Yeast strains with high flocculation rates will usually clear much more quickly than those with slow rates. Some strains also produce more yeasty character than others.

The main mitigation for yeasty beer is simply time. Certain yeast strains as well as lagers take additional time to flocculate and clear, so you need to account for the extra time needed before bottling or kegging your beer. A simple way to do this is to sample the beer periodically until the young “yeasty” flavor fades before packaging it.

A second source of yeast in naturally bottled beer as well is kegs is the sediment at the bottom of the keg or bottle. When pouring from a bottle, avoid disturbing or pouring out the sediment. For kegs you may need to discard a few pints until the sediment is pushed out.

Those are some tips on reducing yeasty off flavors in your beer. Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.

Scaling the Size of a Recipe in BeerSmith 3 Brewing Software

This week I present a short video tutorial on how to scale a recipe to match your equipment profile in BeerSmith 3. BeerSmith 3 has a great scaling function that lets you download and scale a recipe to match your equipment in minutes, or even scale recipes up from homebrew to commercial batch sizes. Total run time is 4:01.

You can find additional tutorials on the main tutorial page and download a free trial copy of BeerSmith from BeerSmith.com.

Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.

Rings of Light – Hazy Pale Ale

Rings of Light – Hazy Pale Ale

Cleared by the final runnings.
My homebrewing-rate has slowed dramatically the last couple months, not coincidentally we brewed our first batch at the brewery around that time (House Saison brew day). Part of that is brewing 10 bbls about twice a week, the rest is how much time I spend at the brewery doing other stuff. My plan for The Mad Fermentationist is to keep up the same style of post, with recipes and tasting notes for occasional Sapwood Cellars beers. I’ll still document homebrew batches when I can, mostly test batches or experiments with impractically weird ingredients.

The first beer I wanted to cover is my favorite of the initial four clean batches, Rings of Light. For those interested the name, is a subtle The Fellowship of the Rings reference: “They watched the pale rings of light round his lanterns as they dwindled into the foggy night.” It is exactly the sort of beer I love drinking, moderate alcohol (4.8% ABV), but with a huge hop flavor and aroma and a surprisingly luscious mouthfeel. Luckily Untappd reviews have been pretty positive, and it is our tasting room’s top seller so far!

You’ll likely recognize most of the elements of the recipe as things Scott and I have been doing for years. Golden Naked Oats, Chit malt, Boddington’s yeast (RVA Manchester), moderate-high chloride and sulfate, less expensive hops in the boil (Cascade and Columbus), and Citra dry-hopping. We added mid-late fermentation additions to several of our other batches, but this one was soft-crashed to 58F before dry hopping so we could harvest the yeast for re-pitching into an IPA (Cheater Hops) and DIPA (Uncontrollable Laughter). 

Scott dry hopping Rings of Light.
The process tweaks have mostly been to account for the differences related to the physics of working at scale. For example, usually I’d add a small dose of hops at 15 minutes to up the bitterness, but in this case the extended contact after flame-out makes that unnecessary (between whirlpool, settling, and run-off near-boiling wort is in contact with hops for more than a hour). In fact, we added one barrel of cold water at flame-out to lower the whirlpool temperature to reduce isomerization. Beersmith 3 includes the capability to specify the average temperature of the wort during the whirlpool, still the estimate seems to be wildly higher than the perceived bitterness. I wonder if the hops settling, mixing with the proteins in the trub-cone slows the isomerization rate?

It has taken a little time to dial in our Forgeworks brew house. We achieved slightly lower efficiency and attenuation on this batch than expected for example. We’ve made a few mistakes and miscalculations along the way, but given neither of us had brewed frequently at a commercial scale I’m happy to report that things have been relatively smooth. Our biggest issues have been with the durability of the equipment itself. For example the rakes in the mash tun detached from the motor twice, and our burner shorted after a boil-over. What is taking the most effort to optimize is our cleaning and sanitation regimen. 

Kegging pale ale.

Thanks to everyone who came out to our grand opening last weekend! I didn’t expect as many fans of the blog to drive from an hour or more away to try the beers and say hello. Either Scott or I will be there most of the time we’re open, so let us know! Happy to show you around and talk brewing. For those further away, I’m also running the brewery’s Twitter and Facebook accounts for now (Scott took Instagram because I couldn’t figure it out).

Rings of Light in the tasting room.
Rings of Light

Smell – Pleasantly mango-melon hop aroma. As it approaches room temperature I get a slightly toasty-vanilla-richness thanks to the yeast playing off the Golden Naked Oats. Otherwise a pretty clean/fresh aroma.

Appearance – Pleasantly hazy yellow, glowing in the right lighting. I guess we did an adequate job avoiding oxygen pickup during transfers and kegging as it hasn’t darkened! We certainly pulled some hop matter into the bright tank, but it mostly settled out and stayed behind when we kegged, as I don’t see any particulate in the pour. Head is really thick, but could have better retention.

Taste – I really love the flavor on this, really saturated with juicy hops. Similar to the aroma, the tropical flavors from the Citra dominate the Cascade and Columbus. We were surprised how hop-forward it was even before dry hopping (perhaps thanks to the deep kettle slowing the evaporation of the oils?). Bitterness is pleasant, but restrained. Well below the estimated 70+ IBUs, more like 40-50 to my palate.

Mouthfeel – Full bodied, especially for a  sub-5% beer. That is thanks to the oats, and low attenuation (which allowed for more malt for the given alcohol). As usually the substantial texture of the head from the chit malt really enhances the perception of creaminess.

Drinkability & Notes – Glad this beer ended up as an early-fall release. It is a little full for a quenching summer pale ale, but it is perfect for temperate weather. The hops are well balanced, and provide enough interest to demand each additional sip. The malt mostly stays hidden, while providing adequate support.

Changes for Next Time – We’ve already got a new batch of this fermenting with the same grist and kettle-hops, although given the tweaks (higher original gravity and different yeast: Lallemand New England and S-04) it may receive a different name.

Recipe

Batch Size: 315.00 gal
SRM: 4.9
IBU: 73.7
OG: 1.052
FG: 1.018
ABV: 4.8%
Final pH: 4.54
Brewhouse Efficiency: 68%
Boil Time: 60 Mins

Fermentables
—————–
75% – 495 lbs Rahr 2-Row Brewer’s Malt
16.7% – 110 lbs Simpsons Golden Naked Oats
8.3% – 55 lbs Best Chit Malt

Mash
——-
Mash In – 60 min @ 153F

Hops
——-
11 lbs Cascade (Pellets, 7.20% AA) – Steep/Whirlpool 75.0 min
11 lbs Columbus (Pellets, 15.70% AA) – Steep/Whirlpool 75.0 min
22 lbs Citra (Pellets, 12.00% AA) – Dry Hop Day 10

Other
——-
40 g Whirlfloc G @ 15 mins

Water
——-
200 ml Phosphoric Acid 75% @ Mash
1.00 lb Calcium Chloride @ Mash
0.70 lb Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) @ Mash
50 ml Phosphoric Acid 75% @ Sparge

Calcium
Chloride
Sulfate
Sodium
Magnesium
Carbonate
120
150
100
20
5
100
Yeast
——-
RVA Manchester Ale #132

Notes
——-
Brewed 8/29/18

Collected 315 gallons of water.

All salts and 100 ml acid right after mash-in. Ran rakes for 15 minutes, started recirculation 10 minutes after mash in. After 10 min of recirculation, measured temp at 152.8F.

Measured mash pH at 5.42, add 50 mL more acid. 5.39, add 50 mL more acid. 5.34.

Sparge water 183F, pH 6.47 with acid addition – more next time

Start of boil with 11 bbls of 1.055 runnings.

Added 1 bbl of cold water at the start of the whirlpool. Combined temperature 196F, added hops.

Run-off started at 66F. .5L/min of O2 through in-line stone.

Ended up with a wort temperature of 64F. Set tank to to 66F. By the next morning the glycol chiller had popped the breaker and the tank was at 69F… Reset and lowered to 67F.

10/31 Raised set-point to 69F to ensure finish.

9/3 Fermentation appears nearly complete from lack of CO2 production. Tastes good, better hop aroma than expected. Up to 70F to ensure it is done before soft crashing.

9/6 Harvested yeast. Left blow-off open so no dissolved CO2.

9/7 Dry hopped with 22 lbs of Citra through the top port while running 25 PSI of CO2 and blow-off arm closed. Closed everything and add 5 PSI as head pressure.

9/8 Pushed 15 PSI through racking arm for 1 minute to rouse, 18 hours after dry hopping. Dropped temperature to 54F.

9/9 Pushed 15 PSI through racking arm for 1 minute. Dropped temperature to 50F.

9/10 Crashed to 36F.

9/12 Moved to bright tank. 3 L/min of CO2 set to 16 PSI got to ~11 PSI at 36 F. 2.6 volumes of CO2 prior to kegging.

9/15 Kegged, 17 kegs with the last almost full.

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Provisional Beer Styles with Gordon Strong – BeerSmith Podcast #178

Provisional Beer Styles with Gordon Strong – BeerSmith Podcast #178

This week Gordon Strong joins me to discuss the new provisional BJCP beer styles including New England IPA, Burton Ale and Catharina Sours along with his travels in South America.

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Topics in This Week’s Episode (54:57)

  • Today my guest is Gordon Strong. Gordon is President of the Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP), a three time Ninkasi award winner as top home brewer, the top rated beer judge in the world and also author of the books Brewing Better Beer and Modern Homebrew Recipes (both Amazon affiliate links).
  • We start with a discussion about the new provisional beer styles including what a BJCP provisional beer style is?
  • Gordon explains the three new styles, starting with the New England IPA style.
  • We discuss the second provisional style which is Burton Ale – and captures an older version of Burton Pale Ale
  • Gordon tells us about Catharina Sour, which originated in Brazil.
  • We talk about the final new style which is New Zealand Pilsner.
  • Gordon and I discuss how the BJCP style guide is now being used worldwide.
  • We talk about his recent travels in South America as well as what type of beers are being brewed down there.
  • Gordon provides his closing thoughts.

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Thanks to Gordon Strong for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
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