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Digital Thermometer Options for Beer Brewing

Digital Thermometer Options for Beer Brewing

This week I take a look at digital thermometer options to use with your beer brewing system. Digital thermometers currently on the market have a wide temperature range, are inexpensive, very accurate and easy to use.

Types of Brewing Thermometers

In this article I want to focus on digital thermometer options, but first I’ll describe the most popular analog options which include the floating glass thermometer and the kettle thermometer.

Most brewers are familiar with the ubiquitous floating glass thermometer which comes with the vast majority of homebrew starter kits. These glass thermometers typically have a temperature range of 0-100 C (32-212 F) and can simply be dropped in the pot or mash tun and left to float. They are fairly reliable though some have questionable accuracy in some cases (usually within a few degrees) and also they are quite fragile. I’ve broken a bunch of these.

The next most common thermometer in brewing is the common kettle thermometer (brumometer, brew thermometer) which typically has a dial face that is adjustable so you can calibrate it. These are inserted in a hole drilled in the kettle, and if calibrated properly before use are typically accurate within perhaps two degrees. These are analog thermometers that are often sold with higher end brew kettles or systems, and are great for brewing.

More recent innovations include digital thermometers both of the cooking (metal tip) kind and the infrared kind. Finally, Blichmann has introduced a bluetooth kettle thermometer called the BrewVision thermometer that is also digital but communicates directly with your phone. I’m going to cover these three models in this article as each has its advantages over the two more common types.

The Infrared Digital Thermometer

First up is the infrared digital thermometer. I bought this model from TackLife (Amazon affiliate link) as it was inexpensive and had roughly a one percent +/-1F (0.5 C) accuracy.

An infrared thermometer shines a low power laser at an object and measures the temperature based on the infrared reflection. So basically to use it you just point and shoot it at the surface of the water and it will give you the surface temperature reading. I found it to be quick and accurate for measuring water, the temperature of the pot itself, and external temperatures of fermenters.

Unfortunately the laser fell short when working with an all grain mash tun. I believe the foaming and grain on top of the mash tun interfered with the laser and I found it often gave inaccurate results when compared to my kettle thermometer or other digital thermometers. So I could use this device while heating my water, but not when measuring the mash temperature after adding grains. So unfortunately this is not a great option for all grain brewers who require accurate mash step temperatures.

The Digital Cooking Thermometer

Next up, I tried a simple digital cooking thermometer. This is the inexpensive model I purchased – an RTS digital waterproof thermometer (Amazon affiliate link). Again the unit claimed a +/- 1 F (0.5 C) accuracy level.

To use this thermometer you simply dip it in the water, mash or beer, and it very rapidly will give you a temperature reading. At high temperature, I found it worked very quickly – usually settling on a temperature within a second or two. At room temperature it took a bit longer to reach a final temperature, but still gave accurate readings within a few seconds.

This unit also did not have any trouble reading mash temperatures or the temperature of any liquid – just dip it in the liquid and you get an accurate temperature reading. I also like the fact that it is waterproof and came with a nice cover and wrist strap so you can keep it handy while brewing.

Blichmann Brewvision Bluetooth Thermometer

The final digital thermometer I got to play with was the Blichmann Brewvision thermometer. While I don’t own one of these yet, I have been able to see them in action both at Homebrewcon and also another BYO event, as well as play with it as a standalone device. The Brewvision is a kettle thermometer intended to be mounted through a hole in your brew kettles as a direct replacement for the popular dial thermometers used on most kettles and mash tuns. The accuracy of the device is +/- 0.5F (0.25 C).

The Brewvision does have a unique feature set in that its bluetooth transceiver connects directly to your iPhone or iPad which lets you monitor and record temperatures (within about 30 feet/10 m if no obstructions). While certainly more expensive (around $99) than a handheld thermometer, I like the flexibility it offers, particularly for monitoring and recording mash temperatures.

As every all grain brewer knows, there are considerable waiting periods when mashing – either waiting to achieve your strike temperature or waiting for the mash to complete. Being able to monitor the kettle from across the room on my phone frees me up for other tasks like cleaning, sanitizing or relaxing.

Since the Brewvision software also lets you import your BeerSmith recipes directly from the BeerSmith cloud, you can easily record and track progress of the mash or boil remotely. Overall a pretty neat solution to ease what could be a long all grain brew day.

Summary

So what do I recommend? Having broken more than my fair share of glass thermometers, I’ve basically given up on them. My current brewing setup has a set of conventional (analog) kettle thermometers on it which are accurate enough for basic brewing work, and I also have an electric controller (Tower of Power) that monitors temperature on my system when recirculating.

I supplement my analog thermometers with a digital cooking thermometer (Amazon link). The reason I do this is that the analog scale is only accurate to a degree or two F, and also you need a reference point to calibrate the kettle thermometers against. The digital thermometer provides that steady reference point so I can make sure the thermometers on the kettle are giving me the right answer. This style of thermometer would also be suitable for those brewing without kettle thermometers, as it is fast and accurate to use.

I am seriously considering a BrewVision thermometer for my mash kettle. That would let me monitor the temperatures on my iPhone from nearby work areas and give me more flexibility during brew day instead of worrying about watching the kettle thermometer while I brew.

If you have thoughts on brewing thermometers leave a comment below! Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing. Also check out the How to Brew Video series I shot with John Palmer if you want to learn more about all grain brewing.

New England Pale Ale: Brewing Video

New England Pale Ale: Brewing Video

NEIPA has a well-deserved reputation for short shelf-stability. I’ve heard homebrewers refer to it as intentionally poorly brewed… but that’s like saying a souffle is poorly baked because it sinks minutes after you remove it from the oven. If there was a way to achieve a beer with the same juicy hop flavor and pillowy body plus long shelf life I wouldn’t complain!

Finished chit malt NE Pale AleThere are brewers like John Kimmach, who says Heady Topper is at it’s best at 10 weeks old. I’ve heard brewers from three or four other breweries advocate holding onto their hazy IPAs (especially the double-dry hopped sorts) for a month or two. Not exactly cellaring potential, but better than the versions that fall apart after a couple weeks.

Cold storage and minimizing oxidation both improve stability, but what else can we do to extend the life of hazy IPAs? Wheat and even more so oats contain higher concentration of manganese than barley malt. Manganese can catalyze oxidative reactions as well as increase protein solubilization. However, I don’t think you can drop wheat and oats from a NEIPA without replacing the extra protein contribution, which adds body and head retention (not to mention haze).

To replace the protein usually imparted by flaked grains, Scott bought a sack of Best Chit Malt and shared a few pounds with me. Chit is essentially the Reinheitsgebot-approved replacement for unmalted barley. It is under-modified, retaining a range of long-chain proteins. Theoretically these proteins could fill the same role as the oats/wheat, enhancing foam and mouthfeel but without the associated drawback to stability. For the first try, I used chit at about the same rate I would flaked oats, 20%.

For hot-side hops, I went for a budget option as I did in my previous batch. For that last batch I used Chinook and Nugget to provide linalool and geraniol. For this batch I used Columbus and Simcoe. Columbus makes up a large portion of the kettle hops for many of Trillium’s fantastic IPAs, providing a nice dank base-note to balance the fruity hops added on the cold-side. I added the Simcoe to the boil because the 3MH it contributes increases during the boil (while catty 4MMP decreases). Certain yeast strains have the ability to converts 3MH (grapefruit and passion fruit) to 3MHA (similar flavors with a lower threshold). Something we’ll be playing with at Sapwood Cellars!

Rather than talk about the brewing process for the 200th time, I took videos of the key points in the process and posted them to my YouTube channel with my descriptions, plus a version without a voice-over. Enjoy! I’m hoping to do more of this, especially as the brewery gets up and running and I have more interesting action to record!

Good Chit NEIPA

Smell – Pleasant mixture of tropical and lightly dank. As always I appreciate a balance rather than the “straight juice” aromatics of some examples. If I want a fruit beer, I’ll drink a fruit beer! The volume could be turned up, despite the heavy hot-side, fermentor, and keg hopping it doesn’t leap out of the glass like my favorite batches. A result of the yeast or something else? Clearly it isn’t malt aromatics in the way.

Appearance – It isn’t clear, but it certainly looks more like an unfiltered West Coast IPA than a standard NEIPA. I don’t brew for appearance, but there certainly is some eye-palate interaction that it doesn’t fit. There are some suggestions that above a certain point more proteins (especially large proteins) are likely to coagulate and drop from suspension. It was hazier the first few weeks, but it cleared up in the keg.

Taste – Crisp, missing the malt sweetness to support the fruity volatiles. The saturated hop flavor is nice, again walking that line between fruity (grapefruit and passion fruit) and dank. Malt is subdued, could use a boost from a portion of English malt or crystal malt. A friend commented that it has a zwickelbier-like maltiness, hard to argue with it being more subdued than most.

Mouthfeel – While the head lasts it is thick and luxurious. It really adds creaminess to the body. While retention started off lackluster for the first couple weeks, it really came into its own. Although after the head fades the body is lackluster. Thin, crisp, just a hint of tannins in the finish. The screen did a good job keeping the powder burn to a minimum.

Drinkability & Notes – It is a unique interpretation of the style. Somewhere between the crispness and cleanness of a Russian River IPA, and the fruity-tropical hop character of NEIPAs. While I don’t want sugary, I think the style benefits from a little perceived sweetness. Drinking this seven weeks after brewing I have to say that it did hold up better than my typical oat-heavy NEIPAs!

Changes for Next Time – A little iso-hop extract might add the longevity the head needs. In exchange I’d move the 10-minute addition later or slightly cool before adding the whirlpool addition. Maybe a small dose of light crystal malt to add sweetness?

Recipe

Batch Size: 11.00 gal
SRM: 3.8
IBU: 62
OG: 1.055
FG: 1.012
ABV: 5.6%
Final pH: 4.65
Brewhouse Efficiency: 68%
Boil Time: 75 Mins

Fermentables
—————-
80.0% – 20.0 lbs Rahr 2-row Brewer’s Malt
20.0% – 5.0 lbs Best Chit Malt

Mash
——-
Mash In – 60 min @ 156F

Hops
——-
2.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 13.00% AA) @ 10 min
6.00 oz Columbus (Whole, 15.00% AA)  @ 30 min Whirlpool
2.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 13.00% AA) @ 30 min Whirlpool
4.00 oz Mosaic (Pellets, 12.25% AA)  @ Dry Hop Day 2
4.00 oz Simcoe (Pellets, 13.00% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 2
2.00 oz Citra (Pellets, 13.00% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 2
2.00 oz Simcoe (Cryo, 26.00%) @ Keg Hop
1.50 oz Citra (Cryo, 24.00%) @ Keg Hop
1.50 oz Mosaic (Cryo, 25.00%) @ Keg Hop

Other
——-
1 Whirlfloc Tablet @ 5 mins

Water
——–
19.0 g Calcium Chloride @ Mash
15.0 g Gypsum @ Mash
2.0 tsp 88% Lactic Acid @ Mash

Calcium
Chloride
Sulfate
Sodium
Magnesium
Carbonate
150
150
150
10
5
40
Yeast
——-
WLP013 White Labs London Ale

Notes
——-
Brewed 10/8/17

10 gallons filtered DC water and 6 gallons of distilled. All of the salts in at the start of the mash. 2 tsp of lactic acid to lower the mash pH from 5.47 to 5.23.

Sparged with 3 gallons of room-temperature distilled water.

Collected 14 gallons of 1.046 runnings.

Chilled to 76F, placed in the freezer for an hour before pitching, and shaking to aerate. An hour later down to 69F, moved to 63F room to ferment. Internal ~68F for most of primary.

10/10/17 Dry hopped. Around high krausen.

10/20/17 Kegged with the Cryo in the stainless steel canisters. Mosaic and Citra were pellets, Simcoe was powder.

I get a commission if you buy something after clicking the links to MoreBeer/Amazon/Adventures in Homebrewing/Great Fermentations!

Belgian Styles with Tomme Arthur from The Lost Abbey – BeerSmith Podcast #160

Belgian Styles with Tomme Arthur from The Lost Abbey – BeerSmith Podcast #160

Tomme Arthur, the Director of Operations at The Lost Abbey, joins me this week to discuss Belgian beer styles, producing high end craft beers, sours, barrel aging and more.

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Topics in This Week’s Episode (44:24)

  • Today my guest is Tomme Arthur from The Lost Abbey. Tomme is co-founder and Director of Brewing Operations. Tomme holds an English degree from Northern Arizona University and has worked at a number of breweries as well as White Labs and Pizza Port, which eventually led to the founding of The Lost Abbey in 2006. He holds dozens of medals including GABF, World Beer Cup, Regional and local awards.
  • We talk a bit about our experience at the Craft Beer and Brewing retreat where we met.
  • Tomme tells us how is love of home brewing evolved into a career in professional brewing.
  • We discuss the story behind Lost Abbey which evolved from Tomme’s 10 years working at Pizza Port.
  • Tomme explains the philosophy behind the “celebration” bottling and distribution in 750 ml bottles
  • We talk about Lost Abbey’s year round lineup of beers.
  • He shares why many of Lost Abbey’s beers don’t fit neatly into a single beer style category.
  • We discuss the challenges of barrel aging, souring, barrel souring and making complex specialty beers on a commercial scale.
  • He shares his thoughts on barrel aging including the barrels they use and methods.
  • We discuss his “Gooze” beer as well as Framboise – two difficult styles to produce.
  • Tomme shares thoughts aobut his seasonal lineup as well as how they rotate production from season to season.
  • We talk about “Red Poppy” which is a celebration of red cherries as well as the complexities of working with fruit.
  • I ask Tomme how he decides which beers to produce for their commercial lineup as well as how new beer development is done.
  • We talk about his most difficult beer to produce as well as his personal favorite.
  • Tomme finishes with his thoughts on crafting beers that are truly unique.

Sponsors

Thanks to Tomme Arthur for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!

http://lakesidepizzeriawi.com/menu-card/capuzzi-classic-supreme/embed/ iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

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Anvil Kettle Strainer Review – Separating Hops and Trub

Anvil Kettle Strainer Review – Separating Hops and Trub

This week I take a look at the Anvil Kettle Strainer, which is actually a pretty efficient way to separate your hops and trub from the wort after the boil when beer brewing.

The Anvil Kettle Strainer

As I covered in an earlier article, I upgraded to a Blichmann BrewEasy 10 gal system last year when I transitioned to electric brewing. Full disclosure: John Blichmann is both a sponsor of my podcast and a friend, so I asked him what worked best for separating hops from my wort so it won’t plug up my therminator plate chiller? John told me to get an Anvil Kettle Strainer.

I was a bit skeptical. Originally I looked at purchasing a hop basket which is simply a screen basket that you hang in the kettle, but I also knew by experience that these can be a bit of a pain as hops tend to gum up the screen and sometimes create a complete blockage. It is always a delicate balance trying to get a screen with the right size to block the hops without gumming up and reducing utilization.

Other alternatives include hop bags, or some kind of hop blocker which attaches to the bottom of the kettle drain. Hop bags work well but obviously you need to keep purchasing new ones and also make sure you have the right size for the amount of hops you want to use. The kettle drain filters work similar to the anvil strainer but typically have a screen which again can gum up.

Blichmann was insistent – so I got one of his kettle strainers which conveniently fits right over the end of the dip tube on his boilermaker kettles. It has two braided stainless steel arms that provide a good wort flow but also filter out the hop bits.

Kettle Strainer Performance

Honestly I was shocked that this simple device works as well as it does. I did not have to worry about bags or a screen jamming, and just added the hops directly to the kettle to get full hop utilization. Unlike a conventional screen or hop blocker, I get a steady wort flow through the strainer after the boil, and almost no hop bits in the finished wort. I always backflush my plate chiller immediately after use, but have found very little hop matter when backflushing.

I believe it is at least as effective as a very fine mesh screen at eliminating hop debris, with the significant advantage of not being subject to blockage. I can usually draw all but the very thick sludge at the bottom of the kettle out getting as much wort as possible from the kettle post-boil. Obviously some very fine hop and grain bits still get through, but certainly not enough to cause an issue with your chiller, pumps or fittings if you properly backflush after brewing.

The other feature I like is that the hop strainer is very easy to clean. You just remove it from the bottom of the dip tube and clean it with some PBW then flush it with water and it easily removes all of the debris. The hose is flexible so you can flex it a bit and under some moving water to remove and trapped debris.

If you have thoughts on other ways to separate trub and hops leave a comment below!

Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing. Also check out the How to Brew Video series I shot with John Palmer if you want to learn more about all grain brewing.

Stonefruit Vanilla Nitro Sour!

Stonefruit Vanilla Nitro Sour!

One slice of white nectarine.Vanilla and fruit are an undeniable combination in desserts. As far as beer goes, it’s gained new popularity in Milkshake IPAs. But it isn’t a new combination for sour beer, going back at least the original Cantillon Rosé de Gambrinus (and more recently Zwanze 2016). I decided to try adding a vanilla bean to a quick sour with white peaches and nectarines to provide depth and balance.

My concept was similar to the “Pop” series from Grimm Artisanal Ales – although I was unaware of them until after brewing. I sampled the Pineapple variant while mine was carbonating and wasn’t disappointed by the bold flavors! My base beer and process shared more than a few similarities with previous batches (including Rhubarb Berliner, Atomic Apricot). Simple pale grist including oats for mouthfeel, no-boil to retain fresh malt aromatics, and no hops in the kettle.

For souring, I turned to GoodBelly probiotics for the first time. While I could have selected a complimentary fruit flavor, I added two “Straight Shots.” Lacto grows remarkably quickly, so no need to make a starter if they are fresh. I only chilled the wort to 85F with my Therminator plate-chiller. There is no need to maintain a high temperature or worry too much about oxygen contact when souring with a pure culture, so I allowed it to slowly cool to my target pitching temperature of the ale yeast to follow. I boiled the remainder of the wort and it continued on to become Nelson Thyme Saison.

GoodBelly Straight Shot face.After a day of souring I pitched Safale S-04, and shortly after added a split vanilla bean – which incidentally have doubled in price over the last year! The following weekend I visited the local farmer’s market and bought a total of 10 lbs of white peaches and nectarines (two of my favorite fruits for sour beer). The nectarines were perfectly juicy and aromatic a couple days later, peaches were a little dry and mealy but still usable. The beer was actually pretty good even before adding the fruit, with the vanilla playing with the doughy malt.

This recipe would be a good candidate for lactose to taste, to reinforce the perceived sweetness that vanilla and fruit contribute, but considering that I’m about to open a vegan brewery… I thought better of it. Instead to replace that “creaminess” I planned to serve the beer on beer gas through my stout faucet. The problem with sour beers (especially quick sours) is that their head retention is often lacking. To combat that, I lowered the pH of the wort pre-souring to inhibit proteolysis by the Lactobacillus.

I wanted more insurance than that though. Reduced isomerized alpha acids can be terrifically foam-positive, but I couldn’t find a reasonably sized/priced homebrew-scale source (e.g., Head Master). I so emailed a couple producers and Kalsec obliged with samples of their Tetralone and Hexalone (tetrahydro- and hexahydro-iso-alpha-acids). These are already isomerized – so no need to boil them to impart bitterness like the typical CO2 hop extracts. I added 1 g of the Tetra at kegging for 5 gallons, enough for 6 IBUs. Incidentally Tetra-hop extract used by Miller to allow them to sell beer in clear bottles with no risk of skunking. Could be eye-catching to serve a fruited sour from clear bottles…

Creamsicle Weisse: Stonefruit
Tetralone from Kalsec.
Smell – Nice fresh white-stonefruit aroma, especially as it warms. Some doughiness (like uncooked pie crust). Vanilla adds depth, but isn’t immediately recognizable. Pleasant aroma, but doesn’t jump out of the glass – partly due to low carbonation.

Appearance – Not a spectacular head in terms of volume or retention, but pretty good considering it is a no-boil fruited quick sour! Tetra seems to have done a pretty good job. The creamy nitro-head doesn’t last to the last sip like some of the stouts I’ve run through the tap, but it is solid. The base itself is hazy and pale yellow.

Taste – Flavor has a nice tartness, sort of citric in the finish. Bright and quick. GoodBelly’s L. plantarum did an admirable job, no weird Lacto-gaminess.  Solid fruit, but not the intensity I was hoping from such good nectarines. In some previous no-boil’s the doughy flavor has played well with the fruit, but in this case it muddies the fruit and vanilla. I don’t taste a contribution from the hop extract, so it likely could be increased. Nice lingering white peach aroma.

Mouthfeel – While the head survives it adds creaminess to the palate. Other than the low carbonation, a pretty typical light-sour thin body.

Drinkability & Notes – It’s a really pleasant, sort of weird/unique sour fruit beer. A good first try at something new, but I probably wouldn’t order a second pour of it at a bar with other things to sample.

Changes for Next Time – Maybe a little light crystal malt to add some perceived sweetness. Boil before souring. Double to hop extract to see if that improves the head retention. More fruit (or better peaches) and maybe even another vanilla bean if it needs it. Half a pound of lactose would be a nice addition if you want it to add a little sweetness. 1/2 tsp dissolved in warm water in the bottom of the glass cuts through the acidity, make it more like dessert.

Recipe

Batch Size: 5.5 gal
SRM: 3.0
White nectarines, onto the peaches!IBU: 6.0
OG: 1.044
FG: 1.011
ABV: 4.3% (ignoring the fruit)
Final pH: 3.46
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70%
Boil Time: 60 Mins

Fermentables
—————–
81.8% – 9 lbs Dingemans Pilsen
18.2% – 2 lbs Quaker Quick Oats
6 lbs White Nectarines – Day 7
4 lbs White Peaches – Day 7

Mash
——-
Mash In – 45 min @ 152F

Hops
——-
1 g Kalsec Tetralone (Iso Extract) @ Kegging

Water
——-
3.00 g Calcium Chloride @ Mash
2.25 g Gypsum @ Mash
2.00 tsp 88% Lactic Acid @ Mash
0.50 tsp 88% Lactic Acid @ Sparge
3.00 tsp 88% Lactic Acid @ Primary

Calcium
Chloride
Sulfate
Sodium
Magnesium
Carbonate
85
75
90
15
10
90

Other
——-
1 Vanilla Bean @ Primary Day 5

Yeast
——-
GoodBelly Straight Shot
SafAle S-04 English Ale

Notes
——-
Brewed 8/26/17

Mash pH initially 5.50 at mash temp with .5 tsp. 5.38… 5.27… 5.12 (~5.37 at room temp). .5 tsp Lactic mixed in with cold sparge water.

Heated to 170F, ran off ~6 gallons of 1.044 runnings through the plate chiller at 85F. Pitched 2 Goodbelly Straight Shots and added 2 tsp of lactic: pH 4.67. 1 tsp more and got it to 4.45. Left at 68F to sour and cool for the brewer’s yeast. Pitched S-04 without rehydration 30 hours after pitching the Lacto. Left at 68F ambient.

8/30/17 Added one vanilla bean, split length-wise.

8/31/17 Down to pH 3.33, but doesn’t taste that acidic.

9/02/17 Added 6 lbs of White Nectarines and 4 lbs of White Peaches (weight before pitting and slicing). Bagged in new nylon knee-highs to contain the pulp.

9/17/17 Kegged, squeezing out the fruit bags. Added 1 g of Tetra hop extract to the keg first mixed with 50 g of beer.

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Brulosophy Brewing Experiments with Marshall Schott – BeerSmith Podcast #159

Brulosophy Brewing Experiments with Marshall Schott – BeerSmith Podcast #159

Marshall Schott from Brulosophy joins me to discuss his ongoing brewing experiments, the Hop Chronicles, Short and Shoddy and his new podcast.

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Topics in This Week’s Episode (51:58)

  • Today my guest is Marshall Schott from Brulosophy.com. Marshall operates the Brulosophy web site which features 160 small experiments in brewing techniques and ingredients. He also joins me to talk about his new podcast, as well as new projects in “The Hop Chronicles” and “Short and Shoddy”.
  • We start with a discussion of some of his recent “exbeeriments” in brewing – beginning with using a starter versus underpitching his yeast.
  • Next we move on to “squeezing the bag” for brew-in-a-bag.
  • We discuss first wort hops versus a boil hops, and loose vs bagged hops in brewing
  • He shares some recent results regarding mash pH and its effects on beer flavor
  • We talk about his ongoing series on beer fermentation temperatures
  • And also his series on off flavors
  • Marshall shares his thoughts on why so many of the experiments do come out “negative”
  • We discuss one of his new projects called “The Hop Chronicles”
  • Also his new ongoing series on poor brewing techniques called “Short and Shoddy”
  • We also discuss his new podcast called the “Brulosophy podcast” available on his web site.
  • Marshall closes with his closing thoughts after over 160 experiments

Sponsors

Thanks to Marshall Schott for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!

iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

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