Select Page
Rye NEIPA with Mosaic and Hallertau Blanc

Rye NEIPA with Mosaic and Hallertau Blanc

Squeeze that grain bag!If you’ve followed this blog, you’ve likely picked-up on my my interest in low-alcohol hoppy beers. For example 3.6% ABV Vienna IPA2.3% Session NEIPA, all the way down to this 2.1% Nelson Wheat-IPA. I’m always looking for new techniques to shoehorn the body, malt flavor, and balance associated with IPAs into a smaller package.

This batch was inspired by a couple of rye-heavy table beer that James Spencer shared with me (video of his process). Rye malt is a powerhouse of mouthfeel, and meshes well with hoppy beers. I paired it with Golden Naked Oats in an attempt to infuse more malt flavor and perceived sweetness.

For a grain bill with more beta glucan than husk the only option is brew in a bag (BIAB)… or start buying rice hulls by the sack. I further enhanced the malt flavor by using a 165F (74C) mash to allow me to add more grain without increasing the ABV. Add to that a quick 30 minute boil, and it was an easy brew day.

I’ve used Mosaic many times, but Hallertau Blanc only once in this Alsatian Saison. I’ve always associated the flavors I get from these two varieties with that of Nelson Sauvin. It all made sense when I read all three contain the same thiol 3S4MP, which is also a signature of Sauvignon blanc wine and provides a grapefruit-rhubarb aroma. With the increasing demand for Nelson, it made sense to see if the other two in combination could serve as a passable replacement.

The old laptop I wrote American Sour Beers on...As if this beer didn’t need another twist, it was my first time attempting to use sound waves to speed dry hop extraction. I’m not the first one to pump decibels into beer (Cambridge Brewing, Green Man, and Baladin all have), but I’m not aware of anyone doing it specifically for dry hopping. When you add pellets they have a tendency to either float, or sink to the bottom. Either way it isn’t ideal for extraction. Playing 80 Hz through an old USB speaker  vibrated the BrewBucket pretty well, hopefully increasing the beer-hop contact. Hard to know how much it accomplished without a control…

Look for my Brew Your Own article about Table Beers in the October issue where I go more into depth on this batch and an ESB that I mashed at 70F!

Rye Table Pale Ale (RTPA) 

Smell – Good Nelson-reminiscent gooseberry Sauvignon blanc wininess from the hops. Herbal notes too from the Hallertau Blanc. Without the alcohol as a vector for the dry hops, the aroma doesn’t pop – or maybe the sound waves drove out CO2 and aromatics with it. A light graininess fills in the gaps in the hop aroma.

Appearance – Hazy without particulate after three weeks cold. Ultra-pale, almost looks like a cloudy Berliner weisse. Head retention is pretty good for such a small beer, but the bubbles are bigger and less stable than the dense foam of my NEIPAs.

Taste – Hop flavor is stronger than the nose. Similar white wine flavors, but with a subtle berry flavor from the Mosaic. Mid-palate is a tad lacking in terms of malt flavor, but the hops linger into the finish covering for it. Bitterness is present, but restrained, just about right for this lean beer. Tastes like beer rather than a malt soda.

Mouthfeel – The body is remarkable for a beer under 2% ABV – a friend called it “creamy” in a blind tasting. Moderate carbonation doesn’t disrupt.

Drinkability & Notes – I’m not sure I’ve brewed a beer that I want to drink more of in a session. One of those that doesn’t wow unless you know what is special about it.

Changes for Next Time – Would be interesting to add some light crystal malt and/or Vienna to try to increase the malt flavor. The body is there. For the hops I might go 2:1 in favor of Mosaic and add a second dry hop to try to enhance the aroma.

Recipe

Batch Size: 5.50 gal
SRM: 5.6
IBU: 44.5
OG: 1.029
FG: 1.015
ABV: 1.84%
Final pH: 4.52
Brewhouse Efficiency: 73%
Boil Time: 30 Mins

Fermentables
—————–
72.4% – 5.25 lbs Briess Rye Malt
27.6% – 2.0 lbs Simpsons Golden Naked Oats

Mash
——-
Mash In – 45 min @ 165F

Hops
——-
2.00 oz Hallertau Blanc (Pellets, 10.50% AA) @ 185F for 30 min Whirlpool
2.00 oz Mosaic (Pellets, 12.25% AA) @ 185F for 30 min Whirlpool
2.00 oz Hallertau Blanc (Pellets, 10.50% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 2
2.00 oz Mosaic (Pellets, 12.25% AA) @ Dry Hop Day 2

Water
——-
10 g Calcium Chloride @ Mash
3 tsp Phosphoric Acid 10% @ Mash

Calcium
Chloride
Sulfate
Sodium
Magnesium
Carbonate
100
170
30
10
5
40
Other
——-
.5 Whirlfloc Tablet @ 5 min

Yeast
——-
SafAle English Ale S-04

Notes
——-
Brewed 6/9/18 with Spencer (Sapwood’s tasting room manager)

BIAB.

Mashed with 4 gallons distilled, 2 gallons of DC tap.

Topped up with 2 gallons of DC and .5 gallons of distilled.

Cool to 185F for 30 whirlpool addition.

Chilled to 75F. Moved to fridge set to 45 for a few hours to cool. Pitched at 62F, set to 68F to allow to warm.

Dry hopped after 48 hours. Hit with 80 hz for 24 hours immediately after adding hops.

Kegged 6/15/18 FG 1.014, 52% AA (1.84% ABV).

I get a commission if you buy something after clicking the links to MoreBeer/Amazon/Adventures in Homebrewing/Great Fermentations!

Inooko Slow Feeder Bowls

Inooko Slow Feeder Bowls

Inooko Slow Feeder Bowls

Some dogs have an uncanny ability to eat an entire bowl of food in less than 0.002 seconds and, while it’s quite a sight to behold, this feat can actually cause a lot of digestive problems (including bloat which is super scary and potentially fatal). If your dog possesses this particular “talent”, help slow things down and keep tummy troubles at bay with a slow feeder, like these specialty bowls from Inooko!

Inooko Slow Feeder Bowls

Made of durable and lightweight melamine, Inooko’s slow feeders come in two unique designs and a whole bunch of fun colors! Shop the collection at inooko.com.

Inooko Slow Feeder Bowls

Inooko Slow Feeder Bowls


Share This: Twitter | Facebook | Don’t forget that you can follow Dog Milk on Twitter and Facebook.


© 2018 Dog Milk | Posted by capree in Dining | Permalink | No comments

Judging Beer with Mirella Amato – BeerSmith Podcast #174

Judging Beer with Mirella Amato – BeerSmith Podcast #174

Mirella Amato joins me this week to discuss the BJCP beer judge program as well as developing skills as a beer judge to improve your homebrewing.

buy Gabapentin 100mg Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and buy gabapentin 800 mg Save As to download this mp3 file

Topics in This Week’s Episode (46:46)

  • Today my guest is Mirella Amato. Mirella is a certified National Level BJCP Beer Judge and one of just a handful of Master Cicerones in the world. She is also the author of the book Beerology: Everthing you need to Enjoy Beer…Even More (Amazon affiliate link) and runs a web site where she provides a variety of beer consulting services at Beerology.ca
  • Mirella starts off with a brief discussion of the Canadian craft beer scene which has been rapidly expanding and seen growth similar to the US.
  • The topic for today is judging beer as well as the BJCP beer judge certification program. Mirella explains first what a “National level” beer judge is and how a combination of knowledge and experience differentiates beer judge levels.
  • We discuss why it is important for a brewer to be able to judge beer and find flaws as well as ways to improve beer.
  • Mirella provides us with an insiders view of what a typical beer competition looks like from the judging perspective.
  • We discuss how beer panels work and how each beer is judged against comparable beers in the same style/category.
  • Mirella explains how you submit your beer to a competition as well as providing a few tips including the critical issue of selecting the right category to compete in.
  • We talk about how the winner of a competition is determined as well as how judges determine the best of show.
  • She discusses the BJCP style guide and how judges often will review the actual style guide when comparing beers. You can find the style guide and sample scoring sheets on the BJCP web site at BJCP.org.
  • Mirella explains how an average homebrewer can gain experience in developing both the palate and vocabulary needed to identify and judge flavors including off flavors in beer.
  • We talk about Mirella’s book “Beerology” and what sets it apart from other beer books
  • She also provides a quick summary of the services she provides on her web site at Beerology.ca

Sponsors

Thanks to Robert Keifer for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
buy Lyrica in mexico iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

Spotted: Buster the Scene Stealer

Spotted: Buster the Scene Stealer

Spotted: Buster the Scene Stealer

First: if you don’t already follow Sunny Circle Studio on the ‘gram, I’d highly recommend it. Designer Erin Wheeler shares gorgeous photos of her home and design projects, which are always super fresh and happy, but ALSO her adorable pupper Buster makes a fairly regular appearance. Obviously, we think he’s a scene stealer, but we may be a little biased. We’ve featured a few of our favorite shots of this cutie pie here, but check out Sunny Circle Studio on Instagram for more!

Spotted: Buster the Scene Stealer

Spotted: Buster the Scene Stealer


Share This: Twitter | Facebook | Don’t forget that you can follow Dog Milk on Twitter and Facebook.


© 2018 Dog Milk | Posted by capree in Other | Permalink | No comments